Live Business Chat
2015 Sep 13, 04:28:22 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is a friendly non-profit discussion group about making money. Click the "NOTIFY" button every chance you get to receive instant alerts about new information. We don't like spam. If your first posts are about something you want from us, it is probably spam, and you will be banned in forums worldwide. No soliciting! If you have problems with the forum, contact badon in the business chat.
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Modern Chinese coin investments #58 - what now?  (Read 8640 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:38:25 pm »



Scroll WAY down to see the coin recommendations and skip the commentary!

It's been an exciting week, and it looks like supply has finally slowed enough to indicate that the warm weather slowdown is beginning. During the slowdown, there will be many opportunities, and plenty of interesting happenings, so while you may be tempted to run away to enjoy time with friends and family, don't forget to check back from time to time because the market keeps marching forward...

I've decided to break up this article's sections into separate posts so the topic thread will paginate before you get to most of the coin listings. That way, the article will load up faster for you, and you can easily quote sections of the article in your replies if you want to comment on some aspect of it. This is an experiment, so I don't know if I will continue to do it this way. Please tell me if you like it this way or not.
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 15, 02:07:17 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« Reply #1 on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:40:57 pm »

Precious metals keep rising

The American dollar is in big trouble, and everyone knows it. The precious metals have gone up very fast, especially silver, and they refuse to stop. There is so much paper money out there that needs to get converted into something more valuable that it doesn't look like anything is changing that would cause the precious metals to slow down. The metals markets are heavily manipulated by criminal governments and their business partners, so it seems likely they will intervene soon if prices don't slow on their own.

In the past, they have ruthlessly forced prices down hard, in order to get people to sell at cheaper prices, then they would let the prices rise again, where they would sell. That works best for things traded on the electronic exchanges, but doesn't work so well for physical precious metals. That's why so many people are demanding physical delivery of everything they buy on the corrupt exchanges, like COMEX.

Right now, they've been unable to deliver all the silver that has been bought on the exchanges, so that has caused a massive sustained increase in prices, as buyers continue to insist on physical delivery. When the criminals manipulate the prices lower, normally that makes people go away, and not ask for physical delivery of something they can buy cheaper once the prices have dropped. Instead, they're not going away, they're just buying more, and STILL insisting on delivery of the stuff they've bought.
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 15, 02:07:35 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« Reply #2 on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:41:17 pm »

Coin market not slowing much

Normally, slowdowns in the precious metals market would happen around the same time that a slowdown in the coin market happens. They're not connect though - metals prices aren't CAUSING slowdowns in the numismatic coins market. Instead, they're just both responding to the same market conditions, and reacting the same way. Coins are affected less, and sometimes not at all, but by watching the metals markets you can get a clues about what's going on in the coin market, which is harder to track any other way.

But, things are a bit backwards right now. I'm noticing slowing in the coin market as sellers sell fewer coins, but prices are still rising. This is the supply slowdown I predicted, which will probably continue throughout the warmer months, with a reprieves when sellers decide they need some money. Normally slowdowns come with decreasing prices, but that's not the case for the coin market, especially for good investment grade coins. It's still early though. Right now, with rising precious metals prices, there's little chance for coin prices to stop or drop. Later, if the precious metals market temporarily drops during the warm weather seasonal slowdown, there's a chance that coin prices might temporarily drop also.

I'm watching closely for this, because it will mean I may have an opportunity to buy some coins for the same, or cheaper price that they've sold for previously. That will be a nice change to stability, instead of constantly chasing prices higher and higher with each new purchase. Later in the year when the weather starts to cool again, prices will certainly resume their upward trend if the trend is temporarily disrupted by buyers and sellers taking vacations during the warm weather.
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 15, 02:07:53 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« Reply #3 on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:41:33 pm »

More Ebay auctions beginning April 19

I reported on this in my last article, but here's a reminder: April 19th, Ebay will begin a promotion that gives sellers free auction listings at any starting price. Since the listings are free, and they can start at any auction starting price, I suspect sellers will be fishing for whales more than usual.

I was hoping that the upcoming auction listings would give us opportunities to buy more coins at bargain prices during the slow summer months, but after some thought, I think it's more likely that a seller would list a bunch of coins at ridiculous prices, and then forget about them while he takes a vacation. I'm sure when he gets back, some of the coins would have sold, and that will make it worthwhile for him to do that.

So, the possible overall effect of the warm weather will be to take coins off the market, or put them on the market at inflated prices. Combine that with the strong precious metals prices, and it looks less likely that prices will drop during the temporary slowdown. I think this will cause eager buyers to become bored, and they'll decided it's time to take a break from coins to enjoy the warm weather with friends and family, just like the dealers.

BUT - and this is important - with both vacationing sellers fishing for whales automatically while they play in the sun, and inattentive buyers not finding much supply of reasonably priced coins, I think it may be a good time to watch for some random meteors streaking through ebay that nobody notices. There may be coins getting offered for sale that few buyers bid on, and there may be coins that rise in price, that don't get their prices adjusted upwards to match because the seller is on vacation.

If you see a seller that still has a bunch of Buy-It-Now listings up when auctions are free, you may want to look closely to see if any of them are underpriced.

Even though it's a slowdown, things aren't dead - it's still probably going to be exciting times due to all the other things going on. It will be hard to stop watching Ebay, knowing that I might miss something the second I stop clicking "reload". I could use a vacation as much as anybody, but...coins...need more coins...
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 16, 02:03:56 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« Reply #4 on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:41:48 pm »

Munich pandas are red hot!

There has been much information and speculation produced about the low quality of coins that pass through Europe. On top of that, pandas have been doing much better than most other series of coins. Munich pandas in particular have become a favorite because they have low mintages to begin with, and most of them have passed through Europe. That gives us both mintage rarity AND grade rarity, which leads inevitably to increased popularity.

Being a panda though, popularity is high to begin with, but Germans are primarily responsible for the vastly increased prices. Being popular with German people is really all it took to make them popular with the rest of the world too, since everybody likes rising prices.

Right now, we have two investment grade surviving population estimates for the Munich panda series from 2 people who have been collecting data about them. The first is PandaCollector (Peter Anthony), the world's foremost expert on panda coins, who says:

A reasonable estimate of the population that could potentially fetch high grades might be around 1,000 out of a mintage of 2,500 per date. 1,000 is not a lot.

The second is from larrydreher, who is one of the most prominent panda coin collectors:

In fall 2010, I had a german dealer find all the silver munich pandas he could.  I told him I'd buy anything he could find with no expectation of condition...Of the 12...I got 8 69's

Those bits of information translate to 40% and 67% survival rate, for populations of 1000 and 1667, respectively. Those numbers are close, but different enough that I'm inclined to pick one as my favorite. I gravitate towards the 1000 figure, because it is based on continuous study of the supply of coins, versus the 1667 figure, which is based an a single purchasing experience from a dealer who probably hand-selected specimens to deliver to one of his favorite buyers. Of course, both figures are speculative, so more time and information will be able to refine the numbers better.

We can start by adding another piece to the puzzle by analyzing data from NGC. Here's some planned mintage information, along with grading numbers from NGC and my own calculations based on those numbers:

1988 5oz   Munich panda mintage 1500 grade 69: 2 of 14, 14%
1990 1oz   Munich panda mintage 2000 grade 69: 12 of 19, 63%
1991 1oz   Munich panda mintage 2500 grade 69: 15 of 28, 54%
1992 1oz   Munich panda mintage 2500 grade 69: 20 of 29, 69%
1993 1oz   Munich panda mintage 2500 grade 69: 25 of 33, 76%
1994 1oz   Munich panda mintage 2500 grade 69: 23 of 28, 82%
1994 1kg   Munich panda mintage 99    grade 69: 0 of 0, 0%
1995 1oz   Munich panda mintage 2500 grade 69: 15 of 24, 63% (3 of the 15 are 70 grade coins, 13% of the 24)
1996 1oz   Munich panda mintage 2500 grade 69: 10 of 16, 63% (1 of the 10 is a 70 grade coin, 6% of the 16)
1997 1oz   Munich panda mintage 1800 grade 69: 15 of 20, 75%
1997 12oz Munich panda mintage 250   grade 69: 0 of 0, 0%

Even though I like PandaCollector's estimate better, the NGC data seems to be closer to larrydreher's estimate. But, since coins sent in for grading to NGC are usually selected as the nicer specimens, while damaged coins are rejected, I think the NGC data matching larrydreher's estimate means to me that the selection of coins he bought in 2010 probably were hand-selected as some of the nicer ones the dealer was able to find, while any damaged coins were rejected as not good enough.

So, it looks like I get to keep PandaCollector's 1000 surviving high grade coins estimate as my favorite, for most of the 1 oz silver Munich pandas with a mintage of 2500.

Also, it is suspected that the whole planned mintage was not produced. In 1997, demand dropped enough to cause the mint to reduce its planned mintage figures from 2500 to 1800. As a guess, I would say that it's possible that 1800 is the maximum figure that was minted in the previous 1995 and 1996 years, if I'm thinking back to what would cause the mint to reduce the planned mintage to 1800. Since 1997 was the last year, we can also guess that maybe the mint wasn't even able to sell the reduced 1800 mintage, so probably less than was planned were made in 1997 too, and that caused the mint to cancel the series.

Interestingly, the only years where a 70 coin is known to exist is 1995 and 1996. Is it because fewer coins were made, so the pace of production was slower, and more careful?

Notice that the number of total graded coins progressively increases from the first year in 1990, to 1993, where the numbers begin to decline. 1996 has the fewest graded, but I suspect the only reason the 1997 beats it is because the low planned mintage number causes people to submit the 1997 coin more frequently for grading.

Without knowing for certain, I think a reasonable guess is that the 1995, 1996, and 1997 coins are the rarest of the 1 oz silver Munich pandas. I think the rarest coin of them all will have to be either the 1996 or the 1997, with good reasons behind both of them. One of them is certainly going to be rarer than the other, but there's not enough info to pick one of them yet. The planned mintage says it's the 1997, but the NGC graded population says it's the 1996. Neither fact is certain enough to be relied on.

I'm sure this will continue to get more interesting.
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 15, 02:08:31 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« Reply #5 on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:42:03 pm »

Sector rotation with Munich pandas

Keep in mind that the Munich pandas are not the only numismatic expo coins. On top of that, their planned mintages are among the higher ones too, even though they've been having the highest price increases lately. Of the 1 oz silver expo pandas, the closest mintage is only 1500 coins, and only the 1989 New York expo coin has a higher mintage, at 4000 (thanks to larrydreher for this list):

1984 1oz   3rd Hong Kong International Coin Exposition 1000
1985 5oz   4th Hong Kong International Coin Exposition 1000
1986 12oz 5th Hong Kong International Coin Exposition 1000
1986 5oz   95th ANA Annual Convention                       2000
1987 5oz   6th Hong Kong International Coin Exposition 2500
1987 5oz   Atlanta ANA Sino American Friendship          2500
1987 5oz   Long Beach Numismatic                              2500
1988 5oz   7th Hong Kong International Coin Exposition 1000
1988 1oz   97th ANA Annual Convention                       2000
1989 1oz   2nd Hong Kong Coin Exposition                    1500
1989 1oz   18th New York International Coin Exposition  4000

So, does that mean that the Munich expo pandas are overpriced, at "a top", or in a bubble? No, not at all.

Firstly, it's popularity stemming from German national pride that has been the primary cause of the recent price increases. Eventually, rarity will be the most important factor in this market, but in these early stages popularity can easily beat rarity, no problem. Why? Because ALL the coins are underpriced. Basically, you could pick anything at random, and make money on it. So, with lots of people picking coins at random, the coins that are going to move up the fastest are the ones that are the most popular - is other words, it'll be the coins that people have some reason to like.

This is why we get sector rotation along with the domination of popularity during the early stages of the market. It's seriously no different than celebrities on the cover of supermarket tabloids. Early in their celebrity careers, they pop in and out of popularity along with all the other new celebrities. That's sector rotation of celebrities. But, for a mature celebrity that's especially talented, their popularity remains steady long after the tabloids have become bored with them.

Right now there are few, if any, mature celebrities in the modern Chinese coin market, so we have a lot of sector rotation as the popularity of each new celebrity coin rises, then falls. Since the prices aren't falling when the popularity falls, that's a sure sign that the market is growing and maturing, even while popularity rises and falls with each sector rotation. In other words, there's nothing to worry about when people get bored with Munich pandas, your investments are safe.

Even though the Munich pandas may not be on the cover of this LBC tabloid next week, that doesn't mean that they don't matter anymore. In fact, they may continue rising in value, even while everyone who has already made money on them tries to ignore them while they move on to follow the sector rotation into some other area of the market. They could easily make a gradual rise to $2000 over the next year, up from the current $1300+ levels, without anyone noticing or caring.

Why would they care when sector rotation has brought them something new that's doubling in value 2 or 3 times in just a few weeks? They probably wouldn't want to sell their Munich pandas, because they're too rare, making them hard to replace, and they're reliable investments. So, if people have extras, they may sell them when Munich pandas cool off, but that's only so they can buy the next hot thing.
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 15, 02:08:50 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« Reply #6 on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:45:07 pm »

What now?

So what do we do now? So many coins have heated up, and cooled down, what's the next thing we should be buying? Pandas, lunars, dragons, medals? What?

Well, the answer isn't quite so simple. I can give you a list of coins I think you should pay attention to, but that won't leave room for surprises. This market is taking on a life of its own. With new information being discovered pretty often, you can bet that there will be plenty of interesting things to keep you busy, and empty your wallet. What sorts of things?

Right now, here's what I think is, or will be hot soon:

* Varieties
* 1992 1 oz silver proof pandas
* Lunars
* Lunar dragons (2012 is the year of the dragon)
* Scallop plum blossom flower lunar coins
* Unicorns
* Silver invention & discovery series in investment grade
* Silver Chinese historical figures series in investment grade
* Chinese traditional culture series in investment grade
* "Medals"
* Silver God of War & Wealth
* Silver coins in general
* Rare small size gold, silver, platinum, and palladium due to increased affordability
* 1/2 oz silver pandas
* Modern painting series
* Modern painting master series

So, there's plenty to choose from, and many of these are quite rare and still amazingly cheap. But, keep in mind that this list does not contain the many surprises that are sure to come. Will it be new varieties? New coins? A big surge in popularity of some coins? All of them? Yeah, probably all of them Smiley
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 15, 02:09:10 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« Reply #7 on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:45:29 pm »

1992 1 oz silver proof pandas on the move

These aren't getting the attention they deserve. 3000 of them are known for certain to have been destroyed by a German dealer engraving torches on them. The rest in Europe are probably damaged in the usual European way (hairline scratches, fingerprints, spitspots, etc). On top of all that, the mintage is split between 2 newly discovered varieties. So, while they're selling for only $400 to $500 in investment grades, and even less ungraded, the 1994, 1995, and 1996 silver proof pandas are selling for around $1000 or more. I think the 1992 varieties are each as rare as those three key date proof pandas, with the exception of the 1995, which has also been discovered to have 2 varieties.

Why am I picking out the 1992, instead of the 1995 then? Well, firstly, I already mentioned the 1995 in my last article. Secondly, the 1992 is much more underpriced than the 1995. The 1995 will certainly rise strongly in value as collectors seek to own one of each variety, and with a mintage of only around 7000 for both varieties together, that means not many of them will be able to achieve their goals of owning both. That will push prices higher, to new record levels for the 1 oz silver proof pandas. But, that requires new ground to be broken, at new price levels no one has ever seen before.

It's not so hard with the 1992 1 oz silver proof pandas. They have a planned mintage of only 20,000 with 3000 lost to torch engraving. That leaves 17,000 split between 2 varieties, assuming the whole 20,000 mintage was produced, which isn't likely (the planned mintage was 10,000 for the 1995). Within days, the price of the 1992 could spike to nearly the current levels of the 1995, and nobody would notice. $900 to $1000 for a proof silver panda isn't big news anymore, and it wouldn't draw much attention. The market has already done a sector rotation away from the 1 oz silver proof pandas minted between 1989 and 1996.

That means you have an opportunity to grab these coins while no one is looking. You can make good money by following the crowd, following the trend, and following the rise in prices. But, you'll make even more money by LEADING. If you don't have both of the 1992 varieties in your collection in investment grade, you better get some of them before dealers notice what's going on, and raise their prices.
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 15, 02:09:26 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« Reply #8 on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:45:46 pm »

Types of varieties

Varieties are fully entering a time where they become important and valuable. Only the panda date varieties have broad recognition, and even those are all too cheap. There are varieties in things like dates, areas on a coin that are frosted or unfrosted, and there are also varieties that are more significant to the basic look of the coin, like the recently discovered 1995 1 oz silver proof panda wide and thin rim varieties. Only a few coins have actual changes to the design of the coin.

Some types of varieties are more significant, and worth more than others, if things like rarity and popularity are the same. Here's a list of variety types that are known to exist, in order of importance, with the most important first:

* restrikes or other special strikes, like specimens or patterns
* design differences (leaves, twigs, etc)
* date
* rim
* major frosting differences
* interesting errors
* minor frosting differences

If any of the above represent some important information, like the mint where the coin is made, it increases the importance and value of the variety. "Minor frosting differences" is at the bottom of the list, but if the mintage is low to begin with and there are only 2 varieties, like with the 1992 1 oz silver proof panda frosted and mirror center leaf clump coins, then the variety may be considered more significant and more valuable.

For example, if the 1992 1 oz silver proof panda frosting differences were on a high mintage coin, chances are good that there would be countless other varieties for that coin, and nobody would care. With a low mintage and only 2 varieties, people care, and the price goes up.
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 15, 02:09:44 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
badon
Administrator
Capitalist Pig
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10316


badon™


« Reply #9 on: 2011 Apr 13, 09:46:02 pm »

Small size silver pandas coming up next?

Silver is getting expensive fast. When silver was cheap, the 1/2 oz silver pandas were discontinued. Now that silver is getting so expensive, it might become profitable for the Chinese mint to sell 1/2 oz pandas. If they do, then you can bet that the older 1/2 oz pandas that have been ignored will get a boost in value simply from the mint's normal marketing efforts. Not only that, but they may find it profitable to produce small size silver coins, just like they do for gold, platinum, and palladium.

Wouldn't it be exciting if we had a selection of 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/10 oz, and 1/20 oz silver coin to choose from?
« Last Edit: 2011 Apr 15, 02:10:00 pm by badon » Logged

If families are a problem for the system, then we must reject the system, not the families.
Founder of the Coin Compendium (forum, blogs, calendar, images, donate, contribute).
LBC makes you rich, with a free ebay gift certificate awarded every month!
The Coin Compendium and the china-mint.info forum, censure, disclosure.
Do not PM questions. Answers should be publicly available.
Backup is not enough. Protect your data with MultiPar.
Writer of LBC Chinese coin investment articles (list).
About me: User:Badon - MediaWiki.org
Badon effect: type 1 to 8, type 9.
I type faster on a TypeMatrix.
Use my work. Give credit.
Coin, medal, whatever!
Coin storage advice.
FreeArc is amazing.
User contributions for Badon - Coin Compendium
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.053 seconds with 17 queries.